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aigeoldsoul:

The “Queen of the Cakewalk”, Aida Overton Walker addressed Black writers/critics’ disregard for and criticism of the acting profession in a December issue of The Freeman. After first addressing the main topic at hand, she proceeded to suggest proactive steps that could prepare up-and-coming black performers for the stage. Below is an excerpt from her article:

"I have stated that we ought to strive to produce great actors and actresses; by this I do not mean that all our men and women who possess talent for the stage should commence the study of Shakespeare’s works. Already, too many of our people wish to master Shakespeare, which is really a ridiculous notion. There are characteristics and natural tendencies in our own people which make as beautiful studies for the stage as any to be found in the make-up of any other race, and perhaps far more. By carefully studying our own graces, we learn to appreciate the noble and the beautiful in ourselves, just as other people have discovered the graces and beauty in themselves from studying and acting that which is noble in them. Unless we learn the lesson of self-appreciating and practice it, we shall spend our lives imitating other people and depreciating ourselves. There is nothing equal to originality, and I think much time is lost in trying to do something that has been done and "overdone," much better than you will be able to do it."

The Freeman (Dec. 28, 1912) - Link

aigeoldsoul:

The “Queen of the Cakewalk”, Aida Overton Walker addressed Black writers/critics’ disregard for and criticism of the acting profession in a December issue of The Freeman. After first addressing the main topic at hand, she proceeded to suggest proactive steps that could prepare up-and-coming black performers for the stage. Below is an excerpt from her article:

"I have stated that we ought to strive to produce great actors and actresses; by this I do not mean that all our men and women who possess talent for the stage should commence the study of Shakespeare’s works. Already, too many of our people wish to master Shakespeare, which is really a ridiculous notion. There are characteristics and natural tendencies in our own people which make as beautiful studies for the stage as any to be found in the make-up of any other race, and perhaps far more. By carefully studying our own graces, we learn to appreciate the noble and the beautiful in ourselves, just as other people have discovered the graces and beauty in themselves from studying and acting that which is noble in them. Unless we learn the lesson of self-appreciating and practice it, we shall spend our lives imitating other people and depreciating ourselves. There is nothing equal to originality, and I think much time is lost in trying to do something that has been done and "overdone," much better than you will be able to do it."

The Freeman (Dec. 28, 1912) - Link

(via kyleandmaxinesdaughter)

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thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Washerwoman Ambrotype
An ambrotype of a washerwoman for the Union Army in Richmond from about 1865, part of the photo exhibition to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, “Experience Civil War Photography: From the Home Front to the Battlefront,” on display in the Smithsonian Castle in Washington, D.C. Photo: Brian Ireley, Smithsonian
http://newsdesk.si.edu/search/luceneapi_node/Exhibitions%20at%20the%20Castle

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Washerwoman Ambrotype

An ambrotype of a washerwoman for the Union Army in Richmond from about 1865, part of the photo exhibition to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, “Experience Civil War Photography: From the Home Front to the Battlefront,” on display in the Smithsonian Castle in Washington, D.C. Photo: Brian Ireley, Smithsonian

http://newsdesk.si.edu/search/luceneapi_node/Exhibitions%20at%20the%20Castle

(via howtobeterrell)

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mldigitalart:

Celia Cruz - La Reina

(via gelopanda)

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artblackafrica:

Nappys de Babi, a natural hair group in Ivory Coast, is paving the way for the re-introduction of natural hair care in the West African country. The word ‘Babi’ is the nickname of Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s bustling capital.

In Ivory Coast, straight hair is the ideal. Many women use relaxers, or wear weaves and other extensions. Additionally fair-skin is highly desired and advertized, leading to the widespread use of carcinogenic whitening products.

According to one of the founders Miriam Diaby, “Society frowns on ‘afro’ hair overflowing all over the place.” Bibi Gagno, owner of the website omgiloveyourhair.com, male stylist Ange-Dady Akre-Loba, as well as Liliana Lambert, a half-European, are part of Nappys de Babi to contribute to the de-mystification of afro-textured hair.

Nappys de Babi’s community has grown to 2,400 members. They hold meetings every two months to share hair care tips, information and their experiences of going natural.

Watch the AFP interview here (French) || AFP article || Facebook || Interview with Ayiba Magazine

(via freshmouthgoddess)

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Serena Williams with a little girl named Kelsey, participates in the ‘Returning the Love’ clinic prior at the US Open, New York, 21.8.14.

(Source: thisistennis, via freshmouthgoddess)

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sugahwaatah:

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

caramellava:

Some Black Artists who are not
Kehinde wiley
Kara Walker
Basquiat
or
Glenn ligon

Nothing wrong with these incredible artists but they aren’t the only ones making art and are also black.
__________________

Romare…

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ukpuru:

blood—sport:

Important things from Igbohistory Instagram. European colonialism has, and still continues to dismantle the myriad of sophisticated social constructs upheld by so many African ethnicities, by presenting Africa as a unit by choosing to ignore the huge ocean of differences between ethnic groups, let alone countries.

Interesting fact: Many African ethnic groups, kingdoms, and states were referred to as ‘countries’ before the rise of colonial powers throughout Africa. They were okay as ‘countries’ when slaves and other goods were being traded. You’ll hear of the Ebo country, Benin Country, Whydah Country and so on when reading pre-1850 writing. If you label a kingdom or a state a ‘tribe’ this those what is described above but also implies there was no major or important political organisation. ‘Tribe’ made/makes indigenous African states and ethnic affiliations sound petty and unimportant. Imagine calling the Edo or Songhai people a tribe when their empires have wielded more power than most of the world ever has? But why would you call them countries when you’re trying to impose your own country on them?

(via fabulazerstokill)

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deux-zero-deux:

demands-with-menace:

Queen Hatshepsut of Ancient Egypt. She has a lovely smile for someone who’s been dead for thousands of years.

she wasn’t a queen. she was a pharaoh and wanted to be referred to as such. she even had her statues modeled after the male pharaoh’s statues to state her dominance and authority. she was actually one of the most successful pharaohs in all of ancient egyptian history and she reigned longer than any other woman in power in egypt.

deux-zero-deux:

demands-with-menace:

Queen Hatshepsut of Ancient Egypt. She has a lovely smile for someone who’s been dead for thousands of years.

she wasn’t a queen. she was a pharaoh and wanted to be referred to as such. she even had her statues modeled after the male pharaoh’s statues to state her dominance and authority. she was actually one of the most successful pharaohs in all of ancient egyptian history and she reigned longer than any other woman in power in egypt.

(Source: xxerlflynn, via ourafrica)

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prepaidafrica:

With her new company, Eleni Gabre-Madhin aims to take the commodity exchange momentum that started with the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange, to the rest of Africa. Report by James Jeffrey in Addis Ababa.

prepaidafrica:

With her new company, Eleni Gabre-Madhin aims to take the commodity exchange momentum that started with the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange, to the rest of Africa. Report by James Jeffrey in Addis Ababa.