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sonjeayiti:

Kehinde Wiley’s Latest Work Features Stunning Portraits of Haitians
While Wiley’s been traveling the world, he’s captured residents of each country he visits. His latest exhibit, World Stage: Haiti, features Haitian residents and will be shown at Roberts & Tilton gallery in Los Angeles from September 13th through October 25th. - For Harriet

sonjeayiti:

Kehinde Wiley’s Latest Work Features Stunning Portraits of Haitians

While Wiley’s been traveling the world, he’s captured residents of each country he visits. His latest exhibit, World Stage: Haiti, features Haitian residents and will be shown at Roberts & Tilton gallery in Los Angeles from September 13th through October 25th. - For Harriet

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vintageblackglamour:

Jazz vocalist Maxine Sullivan was a big influence on Ella Fitzgerald. She was also nominated for a Tony and appeared in several Hollywood films.
Photo by William Gottlieb.

vintageblackglamour:

Jazz vocalist Maxine Sullivan was a big influence on Ella Fitzgerald. She was also nominated for a Tony and appeared in several Hollywood films.

Photo by William Gottlieb.

(via kemeticballbuster)

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women-in-music:

Shirley Horn (May 1, 1934 – October 20, 2005).
American jazz singer, pianist; she collaborated with many jazz greats including Miles Davis, influencing each other; Dizzy Gillespie, Toots Thielemans, Ron Carter, Carmen McRae, Wynton Marsalis and others.
She was most noted for her ability to accompany herself with nearly incomparable independence and ability on the piano while singing. She was nominated for nine Grammy Awards during her career, winning in 1999 for Jazz Vocal Album for “I Remember Miles”, a tribute to her friend and encourager.
Preferring to perform in small settings, as with her trio, she recorded with orchestra too, as on the 1992 album “Here’s to life”, which is highly rated by her fans, the title song being generally considered as her signature song. A video documentary of Shirley’s life and music was released at the same time as “Here’s To Life” and shared its title.
She was officially recognized by the 109th US Congress for “her many achievements and contributions to the world of jazz and American culture”, and performed at The White House for several U.S. presidents. Shirley was awarded an honorary Doctor of Music degree from the Berklee College of Music in 2002. She was awarded the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters Award in 2005., the highest honors that the United States bestows upon jazz musicians.
She had been battling breast cancer and diabetes when she died from complications of a massive stroke.

women-in-music:

Shirley Horn (May 1, 1934 – October 20, 2005).

American jazz singer, pianist; she collaborated with many jazz greats including Miles Davis, influencing each other; Dizzy Gillespie, Toots Thielemans, Ron Carter, Carmen McRae, Wynton Marsalis and others.

She was most noted for her ability to accompany herself with nearly incomparable independence and ability on the piano while singing. She was nominated for nine Grammy Awards during her career, winning in 1999 for Jazz Vocal Album for “I Remember Miles”, a tribute to her friend and encourager.

Preferring to perform in small settings, as with her trio, she recorded with orchestra too, as on the 1992 album “Here’s to life”, which is highly rated by her fans, the title song being generally considered as her signature song. A video documentary of Shirley’s life and music was released at the same time as “Here’s To Life” and shared its title.

She was officially recognized by the 109th US Congress for “her many achievements and contributions to the world of jazz and American culture”, and performed at The White House for several U.S. presidents. Shirley was awarded an honorary Doctor of Music degree from the Berklee College of Music in 2002. She was awarded the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters Award in 2005., the highest honors that the United States bestows upon jazz musicians.

She had been battling breast cancer and diabetes when she died from complications of a massive stroke.

(via kemeticballbuster)

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women-in-music:

Dakota Staton (June 3, 1930 – April 10, 2007).
American jazz vocalist, who was also known by the Muslim name Aliyah Rabia for a short period. She studied music at the Filion School of Music in Pittsburgh, after which she performed regularly in the Hill District, a jazz hotspot, as a vocalist with the Joe Wespray Orchestra. She next spent several years in the nightclub circuit in such cities as Detroit, Indianapolis, Cleveland and St. Louis. While in New York, she was noticed singing at a Harlem nightclub called the Baby Grand by Dave Cavanaugh, a producer for Capitol Records. She was signed and released several singles, including her 1957 No. 4 hit, “The Late, Late Show”.She relocated to England in the mid-1960s, where he continued to record semi-regularly, her recordings taking an increasingly strong gospel and blues influence.Staton died in New York City aged 76

women-in-music:

Dakota Staton (June 3, 1930 – April 10, 2007).

American jazz vocalist, who was also known by the Muslim name Aliyah Rabia for a short period. She studied music at the Filion School of Music in Pittsburgh, after which she performed regularly in the Hill District, a jazz hotspot, as a vocalist with the Joe Wespray Orchestra.

She next spent several years in the nightclub circuit in such cities as Detroit, Indianapolis, Cleveland and St. Louis. While in New York, she was noticed singing at a Harlem nightclub called the Baby Grand by Dave Cavanaugh, a producer for Capitol Records. She was signed and released several singles, including her 1957 No. 4 hit, “The Late, Late Show”.

She relocated to England in the mid-1960s, where he continued to record semi-regularly, her recordings taking an increasingly strong gospel and blues influence.

Staton died in New York City aged 76

(Source: Wikipedia, via kemeticballbuster)

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bainer:

Mary Lou Williams (born Mary Elfrieda Scruggs), jazz pianist, composer, arranger, educator and humanitarian in her apartment in Washington Heights, NYC 1958 (photo by Dennis Stock)

bainer:

Mary Lou Williams (born Mary Elfrieda Scruggs), jazz pianist, composer, arranger, educator and humanitarian in her apartment in Washington Heights, NYC 1958 (photo by Dennis Stock)

(via piccolowasablackman)

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vintageblackglamour:

The Divine One herself, Sarah Vaughan was born 90 years ago today in Newark, New Jersey. In this 1960 photo (Getty) she is on tour in London.

vintageblackglamour:

The Divine One herself, Sarah Vaughan was born 90 years ago today in Newark, New Jersey. In this 1960 photo (Getty) she is on tour in London.

(via kemeticballbuster)

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amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977
12 Quotes
I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.
Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.
Source for image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977

12 Quotes

  1. I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
  2. I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
  3. The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
  4. Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
  5. Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
  6. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
  7. If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
  8. Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
  9. You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
  10. The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
  11. I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
  12. Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.

Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.

Source for image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

(via howtobeterrell)

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thoughtsofablackgirl:

Variety’s Power of Women: New York Impact List.

Variety Magazine reveal its list of powerful New York-based women in Media. A total of 10 Black women made the list including Iman who honored for Humanitarian work in Somalia.

2.Misty Copeland: The first African-American soloist for The American Ballet Theater in two decades. She’s a spokesperson for Project Plie, a “Comprehensive initiative to increase racial and ethnic representation in ballet and diversify America’s ballet companies.”

3. Beverly Bond:  Founder and executive director, Black Girls Rock! Bond is the mastermind behind projects like Black Girls Rock and “Imagine Future” a documentary which debuted at Tribeca Festival. She recently signed a five-year development deal with BET Networks.

4.Lisa E. Davis: Partner, Entertainment Group, Frankfurt Kurnit Klein+Selz. She’s an entertainment lawyer with clients ranging from business in film,television, publishing, music, theater and sports.Her clients include Spike Lee Terry McMillan and many more.

5.Wendy Williams: Host, Best Selling Author and CEO of Wendy Williams Prods, which produce “Celebrities Undercover” for Oxygen.

6.Debra Lee:ChairCEO, BET Networks. With breakout shows like “Real Husbands of Hollywood” and “Being Mary Jane,” BET’s original slate is stronger than ever. “As a testament to our quality programming, we received 19 NAACP Image Award nominations, more than any other network,” Lee says.

7.Kimberley D. Harris: Executive VP, general counsel NBCUniversal. Before joined NBCU in 2013 Harris worked in private practice, government eventually taking a post in the White House Counsel’s Office. At NBCU Harris reports directly to Steve Burke, CEO of NBCUniversal. 

8. Robin Roberts:  Anchor, “Good Morning America.” Roberts became news almost as often as she reported on it in the past year, first returning from a show hiatus during which she received cancer treatment then, while acknowledging everyone who had helped her, outing herself as a lesbian.

9.Audra McDonald: Actor McDonald already has a record five Tony Awards, but she might need to make room on her mantel for another as she is currently starring as Billie Holiday in “Lady Day.” 

10.Sylvia Rhone: President, Epic Records. Rhone stepped down as president of Universal Motown in 2011 to create her own startup imprint, Vested in Culture, it seemed only a matter of time before longtime label maven Rhone would be back at the helm of a major record company. 

(via msdeonb)

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freshmouthgoddess:

seriously !!!!!!!!!! yes

when I think of work I want to create Black women are my main target !!

many a self pub Black woman authors are making a living like this …for us by us / working together !!!

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gradientlair:

nuneyskid:

50-year anniversary of the 9/15/1963 murder of four African-American girls in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Their names are Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robinson, Addie Mae Collins and Denise McNair.

gradientlair:

nuneyskid:

50-year anniversary of the 9/15/1963 murder of four African-American girls in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Their names are Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robinson, Addie Mae Collins and Denise McNair.

(via msdeonb)