Quote
"In South Africa, jealous white women decided that freed women, by their dress and manner, had become “unseemly and vexing to the public” and in 1765 they were forbidden to wear “colored silk clothing, hoopskirts, fine laces, adorned bonnets, curled hair or earrings.” One can understand the vexation over silks, but forbidding a mulatto to walk in public with her hair in curls a hundred fifty years before the invention of the straightening iron was an early and ominous indication of the white South African talent for fine-tuned racial sadism."

— orlando patterson, “slavery and social death” (via ourcatastrophe)

(via blackfeminism)

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goodblacknews:

(via Bronx Firefighter Danae Mines Becomes 1st Woman Featured In FDNY Calendar of Heroes | GOOD BLACK NEWS)
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sourcedumal:

dynastylnoire:

note-a-bear:

dynastylnoire:

blackhistoryalbum:

The Black Victorians | Circa Late 1800s
Source: My Ancestor’s Name

someone cosplay her immediately

how much you wanna bet she was hunting vampires

LISTEN!!!! Someone make this a thing!!!!

I need this.

sourcedumal:

dynastylnoire:

note-a-bear:

dynastylnoire:

blackhistoryalbum:

The Black Victorians | Circa Late 1800s

Source: My Ancestor’s Name

someone cosplay her immediately

how much you wanna bet she was hunting vampires

LISTEN!!!! Someone make this a thing!!!!

I need this.

(via elfyourmother)

Quote
"Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."

Shocking History: Why Women of Color in the 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair in Public by Cassandre of cassandrebeccai.com (via geejayeff)

(via a-spoon-is-born)

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"

As a Caribbean person, in the the light of our historical circumstances, the assertion of my own narrative and presence is important. At one of my first exhibitions, one viewer warily proclaimed “Who she feel she is to paint she self on such a big canvas?!.. She must feel she is somebody.”

Traditionally, we have never completely controlled or had a share in the historical constructions or the configurations of mass-media that label us, and therefore we always run the risk of being misrepresented. I recall being being told, by a well respected artist, that that if I wanted to make “serious paintings,” that I had to avoid using too much colour.

Needless to say, I did not buy this. I continue to challenge the notion that one has to live and work in a place covered by a grey haze to have a “real” and “serious” life. Years later I even found myself making a large black and white painting in response to this and then had fun decorating and violating it with beautiful pink and red artificial flowers.

"

Irénée Shaw, Trinidadian artist  (via caribbeancivilisation)

(via negresse-intensa)

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hardcoregurlz:

http://www.blackgirlscode.com

Black Girls CODE is devoted to showing the world that black girls can code, and do so much more. By reaching out to the community through workshops and after school programs, Black Girls CODE introduces computer coding lessons to young girls from underrepresented communities in programming languages such as Scratch or Ruby on Rails. Black Girls CODE has set out to prove to the world that girls of every color have the skills to become the programmers of tomorrow. By promoting classes and programs we hope to grow the number of women of color working in technology and give underprivileged girls a chance to become the masters of their technological worlds.

The digital divide, or the gap between those with regular, effective access to digital technology and those without, is becoming an increasingly critical problem in society. As more and more information becomes electronic, the inability to get online can leave entire communities at an extremely dangerous disadvantage. White households are twice as likely to have home Internet access as African American houses. Sixty-six percent of Latinos report having a home computer, as opposed to 88 percent of Caucasians.

Through community outreach programs such as workshops and after school programs, we introduce underprivileged girls to basic programming skills in languages like Scratch and Ruby on Rails. Introducing girls of color to these skills gives them an introduction to today’s computer technology, an essential tool for surviving in the 21st century. The skills they acquire through the programs give these young women a chance at well-paying professions with prestigious companies, as well as the ability to enter into the field as an entrepreneurs and leaders of technology.

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

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blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

The Little Piano Girl: The Story of Mary Lou Williams, Jazz Legend
What if you loved music more than anything?…Mary Lou Williams, like Mozart, began playing the piano when she was four; at eight she became a professional musician. She wrote and arranged music for Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, and was one of the most powerful women in jazz.

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

The Little Piano Girl: The Story of Mary Lou Williams, Jazz Legend

What if you loved music more than anything?…Mary Lou Williams, like Mozart, began playing the piano when she was four; at eight she became a professional musician. She wrote and arranged music for Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, and was one of the most powerful women in jazz.

(via unapproachableblackchicks)

Text

kelsium:

You can tell a girl she’s smart her whole life, encourage her in school, buy her a chemistry set, send her to math camp, help her apply for college scholarships in STEM fields, and she’s still eventually going to walk into a classroom, a lab, or a job interview and have some man dismiss her existence, deny her funding, pass her over for a promotion, or take credit for her work. How about you work on getting those assholes out of power and quit telling me not to call girls pretty.

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

Video

yagazieemezi:

Meet the hilarious bestfriends Olivia and Rachel, who star in the upcoming short film “Ackee and Saltfish” where the two girls have to go and get takeaway food after Rachel forgot to soak the saltfish.

http://ackeeandsaltfish.co.uk

(via negresse-intensa)

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the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

www.care2.com

(via frank-e-shadow-tongue)