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haitianhistory:


Rare photo of Madame Masséna Peralte, circa 1936. CIDIHCA Archives. Madame Peralte was Charlemagne Peralte’s mother, the famous Cacos leader opposed to the American Marine Occupation (1915-1934). 

While a law already existed in Haitian cannons to that effect (but had rarely been deployed to the point of having been forgotten by many), in 1916, the Americans re-instituted the corvée, in order to build roads that would facilitate mouvements for the Marines. In practice, the Marines would force every Haitian on chosen locations to work on specific infrastructure projects for that day. Haitian folklore suggests that Prelate’s own mother (who was already an aged lady by this time) had been walking one day when she was taken with a group of Haitians to work on a construction field. This would have in turn enraged (and humiliated) Peralte very deeply. (Source) (Source)

haitianhistory:

Rare photo of Madame Masséna Peralte, circa 1936. CIDIHCA Archives. Madame Peralte was Charlemagne Peralte’s mother, the famous Cacos leader opposed to the American Marine Occupation (1915-1934). 

While a law already existed in Haitian cannons to that effect (but had rarely been deployed to the point of having been forgotten by many), in 1916, the Americans re-instituted the corvée, in order to build roads that would facilitate mouvements for the Marines. In practice, the Marines would force every Haitian on chosen locations to work on specific infrastructure projects for that day. Haitian folklore suggests that Prelate’s own mother (who was already an aged lady by this time) had been walking one day when she was taken with a group of Haitians to work on a construction field. This would have in turn enraged (and humiliated) Peralte very deeply. (Source) (Source)

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goodblacknews:

Entrepreneur Dez White Launches “Invisible” Apps to Protect Text, Call & Email Privacy

Invisible Text

Ever sent out a text you wish you could delete before OR after it’s read? Need to keep details of your business ultra-confidential? Want to make phone calls or send emails completely off the record?…

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5centsapound:

Zanele Muholi: Of Love & Loss (2014) - Currently showing at Stevenson Gallery in Johannesberg (South Africa) from 14 February - 4 April 2014.

The opening coincides with the presentation of a prestigious Prince Claus Award to Muholi.

Gallery Statement:

In times of increasingly homophobic legislation enacted by African countries and in a climate of intolerance towards homosexuals in the Western world, South Africa distinguishes itself with a Constitution that recognises same-sex marriages; yet the black LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) community is plagued by hate crimes. Black lesbians are particularly vulnerable and are regularly victims of brutal murders and ‘curatives rapes’ at the hand of neighbours or ‘friends’.

Since 2013 Muholi has been documenting weddings and funerals in the black LGBTI community in South Africa, joyful and painful events that often seem to go hand in hand. The show features photographs, video works and an installation highlighting how manifestations of sorrow and celebration bear similarities and are occasions to underline the need for a safe space to express individual identities.

As Muholi writes:

Ayanda Magoloza and Nhlanhla Moremi’s wedding in Katlehong took place four months after Duduzile Zozo was murdered in Thokoza. Promise Meyer and Gift Sammone’s wedding in Daveyton took place on 22 December in Daveyton, 15 days after Maleshwane Radebe was buried in Ratanda. Six months earlier, Ziningi and Delisile Ndlela were married in Chesterville, Durban. Many in the area attended the ceremony, blessed the newlywed couple and prayed for them and their children. We long for such blessings as we continue to read about the trials and tribulations that LGBTI persons experience in their churches, where homosexuality is persecuted. In 2014, when South African democracy celebrates its 20 years, it seems more important than ever to raise again our voice against hate crimes and discriminations made towards the LGBTI community.

The exhibition includes also a series of autobiographical images, intimate portraits of Muholi and her partner taken during their travels, a tender counterpoint to the tension still generated in South Africa today by same-sex and interracial relationships.

see her past work here.

(via poc-creators)

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yagazieemezi:

Akwaeke Zara Emezi is an Igbo and Tamil writer born in Umuahia and raised in Aba, Nigeria. Her first full length novel, Somadina, was selected as a finalist for the New Visions Award by Lee and Low Books.

Published by The Sable E-Mag, her latest short story:

FEMIMO:

I took one of my taxis to the estate so that no one would recognise the car. The security at the first gate waved us in with a cursory flick of their torchlights, not bothering to bend to the window. After all, the taxi was only a common yellow, not the oil black that would tell them they could smile with expectation and not the shiny sugar red that would merit at least a curious glance through the glass. I did own cars like those, but I’ve long found the poor man’s yellow to be the most useful. I inherited them all with my father’s company when he stumbled to his knees and quietly died during a morning jog two years ago. My mother became a muted and folded woman after that, thinning out until I grew concerned about her fragility. Every time she blessed me, her palms felt like spun paper about to flake gently over my scalp. It had been nothing to do my duty, to ease her mind, to come home and take over.

As we pulled through the second gate, I turned over the invitation in my hands, feeling out the weight of the heavy paper. The driver spun the steering wheel slowly and drove the taxi into a corner of the sprawling parking lot. He was one of the few that I trusted, a sour old man with sharp ears, selective hearing and he was a beast behind a steering wheel. I handed him a fold of thousand naira notes and he handed me a mask in return- soft leather, made in battered oxblood. When I held it briefly against my face, it felt like another skin.

Aima had left me five weeks ago, after I watched her crumple against a wall while sobbing that I would never marry her. I didn’t mean to just watch, I knew I was supposed to pick her up, cradle her against me and tell her that I loved her, that of course I would marry her, but the raw bitterleaf truth was that I didn’t recognise the hysterical woman she had become. The things she said sounded like another woman’s mouth had eaten hers. When she finally stood up and looked at me with completely betrayed eyes, I didn’t recognise myself either. Tonight, my intent was to forget about both of us, the interminable drive to the airport and how she didn’t even turn around for a last look … (keep reading)

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

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Anonymous asked: Do you have any opinion on the new Lifetime show "Bring It!", specifically on critics' description of it as "ghetto"?

allerasphinx:

Well it’s about a bunch of black kids from the south, so of course it’s ghetto. Ugh, they speak AAVE! How uneducated!

You can guess what I’m gonna say about the critics…

I saw a preview for this show a while ago, and recently watched two episodes. The only difference between this show and “Dance Moms” is that in “Bring It,” the mothers are less insufferable, the coach doesn’t yell at the girls all the time and is more supportive, the mothers can be competitive but they’re not petty, they focus on very driven pre-teen and teenaged black girls from different walks of life doing something positive and uplifting (that’s part of their heritage), and the kids support one another.

There’s one kid whose aunt has taken care of her since she was a baby. She got upset with the coach for picking on the poor girl, got into an argument with the coach, and then took the kid (who was noticeable upset about the argument) out of class. Before driving off, her aunt asks her why she wants to be on the team if the coach makes her upset, she explains because they’re the best and she wants to be the best.

Her aunt also explains why she’s angry…because she’s the only thing that she loves in the entire world, she wants to give her all the opportunities that she never had, she wants a different life for her and that’s why she gives her everything she has…and that’s why she hates seeing her berated and hurt etc. It was really touching and in the end she did what was best for her kid, which is decide that even if the adults are bickering and they don’t like each other, her daughter’s happiness comes first. Her friend, who’s one of the top young dancers in the class was so happy to see her come back.

I mean…what’s ghetto about that? How often do you see complex depictions of black women and little black girls like that?

eta: The black people describing it as a “ghetto version of Dance Moms” or describing it as “ratchet” are doing themselves a huge disservice. Like, stop drinking the koolaid that convinced you that anything involving black people is “ghetto” and “ratchet” despite the show being everything but.

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aliceinnappyland:

Nell Painter (formerly Nell Irvin Painter) is an interesting one. She’s a highly respected and highly accomplished historian (seven books, winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship for Humanities, headed two prestigious historical associations, and that’s just to name a few) with a focus on America history and the intersections of race, class, and gender. But she walked away from it all in 2005. She swore to never write another word of history and turned her focus on her second passion, painting.  

Read more

(via poc-creators)

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After controversy over lack of ethnic representation, a black woman is crowned Miss Bahia 2013; protests highlight the contradiction of race

22-years old, 5’9” (1.73 m), psychology student Priscilla Cidreira, representing the district of Santa Cruz, in Salvador, Bahia, was crowned Saturday (25) as the most beautiful woman in the state, at an event held at the Sheraton Hotel in Salvador. Elected among 30 candidates, the winner will now compete in the Miss Brazil contest on September 28, in the state of Minas Gerais. The second place went to Miss Luis Eduardo Magalhães with third place going to with Miss Itabuna.
The young woman drew attention for being one of only two black candidates in the contest. The large number of blonde women competing for Miss Bahia sparked controversy on the internet, with protests through social networks and blogs for not representing the profile of the population of Bahia. According to some of the protests that also included online petitions, the state that has a 76.2% black population, should have had more participants of this ethnicity.

 The new Miss Bahia declared at the contest that her big dream is to travel the world. The winner also showed herself to be in tune with her origins, emphasizing among the personalities she admires, two black women: former Miss Universe from Angola Leila Lopes and American first lady, Michelle Obama. (via Black Women of Brazil)
After controversy over lack of ethnic representation, a black woman is crowned Miss Bahia 2013; protests highlight the contradiction of race

22-years old, 5’9” (1.73 m), psychology student Priscilla Cidreira, representing the district of Santa Cruz, in Salvador, Bahia, was crowned Saturday (25) as the most beautiful woman in the state, at an event held at the Sheraton Hotel in Salvador. Elected among 30 candidates, the winner will now compete in the Miss Brazil contest on September 28, in the state of Minas Gerais. The second place went to Miss Luis Eduardo Magalhães with third place going to with Miss Itabuna.

The young woman drew attention for being one of only two black candidates in the contest. The large number of blonde women competing for Miss Bahia sparked controversy on the internet, with protests through social networks and blogs for not representing the profile of the population of Bahia. According to some of the protests that also included online petitions, the state that has a 76.2% black population, should have had more participants of this ethnicity.

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 The new Miss Bahia declared at the contest that her big dream is to travel the world. The winner also showed herself to be in tune with her origins, emphasizing among the personalities she admires, two black women: former Miss Universe from Angola Leila Lopes and American first lady, Michelle Obama. (via Black Women of Brazil)

(Source: reclaimingthelatinatag, via dimwen)

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classicladiesofcolor:

Here is vaudevillian Nora Hendrix being interviewed about her late grandson, Jimi.

(via msdeonb)

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(Source: daughterofzami, via curvellas)

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vintageblackglamour:

Beautiful Alfre Woodard, onstage in a Boston University production of Thesmophoriazousae. Ms. Woodard, a native of Tulsa, Oklahoma, graduated from Boston University’s College of Fine Arts in 1974 with a degree in drama. She also received an honorary degree in 2004. Photo by BU Photography.

vintageblackglamour:

Beautiful Alfre Woodard, onstage in a Boston University production of Thesmophoriazousae. Ms. Woodard, a native of Tulsa, Oklahoma, graduated from Boston University’s College of Fine Arts in 1974 with a degree in drama. She also received an honorary degree in 2004. Photo by BU Photography.

(via queenaigethefirst)